Letter W Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter W ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter W sound.

Window Letters

Window letters are a fantastic way to practice letter sounds! All you have to do is squirt water on the window and watch the foam letters stick! A water bottle with a squirt top works great and is perfect for little hands. Your child can practice saying the letter sounds as they squirt the letters, or more advanced readers can combine letters to make simple words! Either way, it’s a cheap and easy activity your children or students will love!  

Letter W Watermelon

W is for Watermelon! This creative letter craft is a wonderful way to reinforce that letter W sound with your kids or students! Try it out and don’t forget to share your artwork with us!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Walrus Craft

Check out this week’s ABC See, Hear, Do animal craft! This walrus is so adorable and fun.

Letter W Watermelon Craft

Watermelons are such a yummy summer treat! Why not make this easy watermelon painting with your children or students? Slice a potato watermelon-style. Then add pink and green paint to a plate and watch as your child dips the potato wedge into the pink and stamps the paper. Use a paintbrush (or a finger) to add green for the rind, and after drying, use a marker (or black paint) to draw seeds! Then enjoy your child’s cute new painting!  

Letter W Whale Snack

W is for Whale! This whale snack is a clever way to help your little ones learn that letter W sound!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BFOGLJUH, and D ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Introducing...ABC See, Hear, Do Enrichment Pages!

ABC See, Hear, Do Enrichment Pages are now available in our printables store! I’m super excited about these – here’s why!

Each enrichment page is dedicated to one letter of the alphabet. And they’re color-coordinated! The backgrounds of each page are clustered in the same letter groupings as in ABC See, Hear, Do: Learn to Read 55 Words, making it easy to sort the pages. Or if you’d prefer to keep them in alphabetical order, that’s fine, too!

Speaking of sorting, I recommend storing the enrichment pages in a folder or binder with sheet protectors for each page. We all know what spills and little hands can do!

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Each enrichment page includes:

Picture Book Suggestions: 7 fiction texts and 3 nonfiction texts related to the featured letter. We’ve looked long and hard to find books that are not only readily available at libraries and on Amazon, but are also of the highest quality around! Use these books to reinforce letter learning and build your own picture book library!

Snack Ideas: general snack ideas for each letter, as well as a creative snack idea.

Craft Ideas: simple and fun crafts that are easy on the budget and young crafters.

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Songs/Rhymes: two catchy songs/rhymes to reinforce letter learning! Beware: they may get stuck in your head.

Games/Activities: two games/activities per letter to get your kids moving while they learn.

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Once you’ve downloaded your pages, the options are endless! Pick and choose which activities and what pace works best for you. Perhaps you’ll use multiple elements on the page for a Storytime or a preschool day. Maybe you’ll focus on one letter per week and do an activity every day. Do what works for you.

The best thing about the enrichment pages is that they make planning a cinch! Yes, you could google and search Pinterest for hours on end to find similar ideas, but why? We’ve already got you covered! Go spend your time doing something fun!

Long story short: Let us do the work, so you can focus on what matters most: your kids. And mom time. J

Check out the Enrichment Pages and let us know what you think!

 

 

 

The Process of Creating the ABC Books

Hi, Stef here. I’m the author/illustrator of the ABC See, Hear, Do books.

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Many people ask me about the process of writing the ABC books– where do I come up with ideas and how do I do the illustrations?

The first thing I do is a LOT of research. This includes researching the way kids learn, the complexities of learning to read, sounds needed to read, and of course, various animals!

Once my brain is stuffed with all that information, I write the text of the book and send it through multiple rounds of revisions– with writing critique groups, moms who test it with their children, preschool teachers, speech-language pathologists, and my editor.

With the text complete, I start drawing. I started out with Sharpies and computer paper. You can see me draw the crab from ABC See, Hear, Do: Blended Beginning Sounds here:

 

I have now upgraded to an ipad and apple pencil, which makes revisions a lot easier. After my drawings are done, send them to my graphic designer, who adds color and formats each book for me. We bounce ideas back and forth and come up with plenty of revisions until it’s just right.

At that point, I send an electronic version of the book to my teams of critique partners, moms, and teachers again for even more feedback. After more revisions, my editor goes through it one final time.

Then I get a proof printed and test the actual book with children, watching carefully how they respond. When that testing is complete, I have a second editor go through the printed copy of the proof. Together we make more changes and order more proofs, until we’re ready for publication. For the first book, we ended up ordering three more proofs before it was just right. Yet as we’ve worked on sequential books, we’ve also learned what works and what doesn’t, making the process easier.

I publish the books through CreateSpace to sell on Amazon and through IngramSpark to sell to bookstores.

And as you can see, writing and publishing the ABC See, Hear, Do series isn’t just about me, though my name is on the cover. It’s a team effort, and I’m so grateful for the wonderful people who help me make it happen!

Be sure to check out these posts if you missed them!

Learning to Read Readiness

Learning Styles

9 Tips for Using ABC See, Hear, Do Memory Game Flashcards

 

 

 

 

Letter D Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter D ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter D sound.

Alphabet Dirt

D is for dirt! If you can handle a little mess, try an alphabet dirt sensory bin! A bag of potting soil and some alphabet letters make this an easy activity to put together. Mix everything in a bin or container and let your child dig for letters!

Letter D Dalmatian

D is for Dalmatian! This letter craft is an easy way to reinforce this letter sound with your kids or students. All you need are paper, scissors, and glue for the body, and a marker to draw your very own dalmatian’s adorable face.

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ABC See Hear Do Dog Craft

We love our ABC See, Hear, Do Crafts, and this one is no exception! This dog craft is easy to do, and your kids or students will be so proud of themselves! Don’t forget to share their creations with us! We love seeing all your creativity and hard work!

Letter D Dandelion Craft

D is for dandelions! Make these colorful dandelions to reinforce the letter D. Draw an outline of a dandelion, then squirt paint on a paper plate. Encourage your child to use their fingertips to paint the flower, and enjoy their beautiful creations!

Letter D Dirt Snack

Who doesn’t love eating dirt?! This delicious snack is sure to put a smile on your children’s faces. Don’t forget to add the worm!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BF, O, G, L, J, U, and H ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Letter H Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter H ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter H sound.

Alphabet Hopscotch

Alphabet hopscotch is a great way to make alphabet practice active and fun! Using sidewalk chalk, draw a hopscotch board with letters instead of numbers. Your child can jump to each letter, saying the sounds of each letter they land on!

Letter H Haunted House

This spooky letter craft is a creative way to reinforce the letter H sound! Your students or children will love creating their very own haunted house with you. Grab stickers, scissors, construction paper, and glue, and you’re ready to create a scream-worthy craft!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Hippo Craft

H is for Hippo! This adorable craft, inspired by the ABC See, Hear, Do book, is a fun way to reinforce the letter H sound with your kids or students!

Letter H Heart Pom-Pom Craft

H is for hearts, and painted Pom-Pom Hearts are a fun way to practice the letter H sound! Cut out multiple heart shapes from various pieces of colored paper. Then make your own pom-pom paint brush with a clothespin and a pom-pom (or cotton ball). Squirt paint on a plate or palette and let your child get busy painting and decorating their hearts!

Letter H Heart-shaped Snack

This simple but delicious heart-shaped snack is a fun way to practice the letter H sound with your little ones! Try it sometime this week and don't forget to share your creations with us!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BFOG, L, J, and U ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Fourth of July Crafts and Activities

Need simple patriotic crafts and activities for the Fourth of July? We’ve got you covered!

Splatter Art Alphabet Stars

These Splatter Art Alphabet Stars are a great way to add even more fun to kid crafting! Using cardstock, cut out as many stars as you want. Then find a place that can get a little messy (outside works great!). Lay the stars on the grass or over newspaper, butcher paper, etc. Then help your child dip their paintbrush in blue or red paint and “splatter” the paint all over the stars! Once all the splattering is complete, let the stars dry. At that point, you can add letters to write words for a cute decorative banner, or you can play games, like hiding them around the yard for little ones to find!  Either way, this will be a fun (and messy!) project you and your child can enjoy together!

Glitter and Glue Fireworks

Fireworks are an iconic part of Fourth of July, but cranky kids who stay up too late are… not so fun. So instead of staying up late to watch them, you and your little ones can make your own!  Using glue, make fireworks shapes one or two at a time. Cover each new glue addition with your choice of colored glitter, making sure to shake off any excess. Repeat until you have filled your paper with bright and colorful glitter fireworks!

Alphabet Parade

The Fourth of July isn’t complete without a parade! Why not make an alphabet parade with siblings, neighbors, cousins, parents, or whoever wants to join in on the fun? All you need are alphabet flags (and candy to throw at the spectators)! To make the flags, grab paper, sticks, and markers.  Start by cutting a piece of paper to the desired size. Add a targeted letter to each side, then let your child decorate their flag. When they’ve finished decorating, tape a stick or skewer to it, and it’s ready to be used for the parade! Don’t forget to encourage everyone to say or shout their letter sounds as they march!  

Painted Handprint Flag

Try this easy but adorable painted handprint flag! All you need are blue and red paint, a piece of paper or cardstock, and a paintbrush. First, paint your child’s hand with blue paint. Once covered, stamp their hand in the upper left corner to represent the stars. Then, using red paint and a paint brush, encourage your child to paint stripes horizontally across the paper. Let dry and  enjoy their patriotic artwork!

American Flag Snack

Try this easy and healthy American Flag snack to celebrate the Fourth of July! First, spread cream cheese over a graham cracker. Next, add blueberries or blackberries in the upper left corner as the “stars.” Finally, let your little one make stripes using cut up strawberries.  Yum!

We hope you enjoyed our Fourth of July crafts and activities! For more great ideas, check out our Mother’s Day crafts, Father’s Day crafts, or our letter crafts and activities, like the letters C,  A, T, MS, R, I, P,  B, F, O, G, L, and J ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

 

Letter U Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter U ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter U sound.

Umbrella Letter Game

We found these umbrellas at the dollar store, and voila! We used them for an inexpensive letter game! Tape a letter to each umbrella, then stick all the umbrellas in a bowl. Take turns picking out umbrellas with your little one and saying the sound of each letter. And never fear—if you can’t find mini-umbrellas, you can always cut umbrella shapes out of paper, add a letter to each one, and stick them a bowl, too!  

Letter U Underwater Craft

This letter U craft idea is creative and easy to do! You and your little ones will have a great time creating your own underwater adventure!

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ABC See, Hear, Do U Umbrella Bird

Your kids are going to love making this fun umbrella bird from ABC See, Hear, Do! Don’t forget to share your children’s projects with us! We love seeing what you create!

Letter U Utensil Painting

In this utensil painting craft, all those weird utensils you’ve got floating around your kitchen will suddenly prove indispensable. Find a bunch of unique utensils, like a potato masher, slotted spoon, or a whisk. Give your child a paper and some paint, and just wait to see all the cool things their utensils can create!

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Letter U Underwater Snack

What kid doesn't love colorful icing, goldfish, and graham crackers?! Try making this fun underwater snack with your kids!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BF, O, G, L, and J ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Letter J Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter J ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the letter J sound.

Jumping in Puddles

J is for jump!  To play this fun puddle-jumping game, cut blue “puddles” from construction paper. Draw your targeted letters on top and laminate if you prefer extra durability. Lay your puddles down indoors or out and call out letter sounds while your child “splashes” into the matching letter puddles. Rain boots are optional (but always welcome!).   

Letter J Jellyfish

J is for jellyfish! These letter crafts are such a fun way to help your kids or students learn letter sounds!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Jaguar Craft

J is for jaguar! Create this jaguar as a companion craft to our ABC See, Hear, Do book!

Jellyfish Hot-glue Resist Craft

This is one of our favorites! Using a hot glue gun, trace a jellyfish design on cardstock. Once hardened, let your child paint the design with watercolors. The hot glue resists the watercolor, creating a nice outline for your child to paint in (or outside!) the lines.  

Letter J Jellyfish Snack

This simple jellyfish snack consists of bread with banana-raisin eyes and a celery mouth, finished off with strings of string cheese. Gobble it down with your kiddos while reinforcing the letter J sound! Try it today and let us know how it goes!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BF, O, G, and L ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

9 Tips For Using ABC See, Hear, Do: Learn to Read 55 Words

ABC See, Hear, Do: Learn to Read 55 Words can be used in many different ways. Try these ideas to see what works best for your child!

Work on one letter sound per day/week:

Use the book to review each letter sound and then supplement learning of the highlighted letter sound with crafts, activities, and games.

Work on a cluster of 4 letters at a time:

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The book is divided into sections of 4 letters. Work on each group of 4 letters until your child remembers those sounds. Go at her pace– this may take minutes or multiple days, depending on the child. Once she’s mastered the small group of letter sounds, help her read the words that correspond with those letters. After she has mastered each section, move on to the next.

Focus only on the letter sounds, not the words:

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Go through the book with your child until he has learned all the letter sounds, skipping all the pages with practice words. After your child has mastered the sounds, go back to the word pages and practice blending sounds together.

Read the entire book:

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Sometimes kids are ready to read through the entire book, right off the bat. Help her learn each letter sound and let her try to sound out all the words.

Use flashcards:

There are multiple variations of flashcards available to supplement this book. You can buy them here. As your child reads the book, encourage him to match the flashcards to words as a spelling practice.

Writing:

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For children interested in learning to write, encourage them to copy words from the book onto a piece of paper. Then ask them to read the words on the paper.

Siblings:

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If your child has older siblings, involve them! Older siblings can read the book with their younger sibling and help her practice letter sounds. If your child has younger siblings, she can teach them the letter sounds as she learns them. This is a great way to both reinforce sounds and encourage family bonding.

The child as the teacher:

Encourage your child to play school and teach his stuffed animals the letter sounds. Or, for the more tech-savvy child, help him create a YouTube video in which he teaches the audience how to read.

Follow your child’s lead:

Above all, the best thing to do is follow your child’s lead. On one day, she might read the whole book. But the next day, she might want to practice only a few letter sounds. That’s okay. The point is to keep the process fun and engaging, so she will continue to enjoy practicing her reading skills.

Are there other ways you use ABC See, Hear, Do: Learn to Read 55 Words? We’d love to hear about them!

For more great tips, check out these posts:

Are You Frustrated Trying to Teach Your Child to Read?

Learning to Read Readiness

Learning Styles

Father's Day Crafts

Stumped for Father’s Day ideas? Check out our simple and cute Father’s Day crafts, perfect for little hands to make!

Handprint I Love You Canvas

What better way to show your love for Dad than with a handprint and an “I love you”? This project is super easy! Grab a mini-canvas at your local craft store or dollar store. Paint your child’s hand with a color of their choice. Then stamp the canvas with their hand and let them write “I love you” (don’t forget to wash their hands first!). If they can’t write yet, write the note for them! Such a simple and easy way to show Dad he’s loved!

I Love Dad Paint Resist

Here is another simple Father’s Day craft! Tape a message on a piece of cardstock with painter’s tape. We spelled out “I love Dad,” but feel free to write whatever you’d like! Then let your little one fill the paper with paint! After letting the paint dry, carefully pull off the tape, and you’ve got a personalized message just for Dad!

Framed Photo and Artwork Mat

This simple photo frame takes only a few supplies, but it results in an adorable present for Dad! You’ll need an 8x10” frame, a piece of cardstock, markers, scissors, and a photograph.  Use the photograph as a guide and trace the center cut-out of the cardstock (you can also use a ruler or eyeball it).  Remember to make the cut-out just a hair smaller than the photo, so that the photo will stay in place more securely. Cut out the traced shape.  Then let your little one color, draw, or write on the remaining cardstock (this will become your photo mat). Once it’s complete, tape the photo to the back of the mat, stick it in the frame, and you’ve got an awesome craft Dad will love!

We hope you enjoyed our Father’s Day crafts! For more great ideas, check out our Mother’s Day crafts, Easter and Spring crafts and activities, or our letter crafts and activities, including the letters c, a, t, m, s, r, i, pbf, o, and g. And subscribe so you don't miss any future postings!

Letter L Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter L ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter L sound.

Laundry Letters

Laundry letters is a fun activity to practice the letter L and review other letters. Make mini-clothes out of paper or cardstock and give each piece of clothing a letter. Children can match uppercase to lowercase letters, say the letters or sounds, or even blend sounds to make words. No detergent required!

Letter L Llama

L is for Llama! This fun and tactile letter L animal is the perfect way to reinforce that letter sound with your kids or students!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Lion Craft

L is for Lion! Your kids or students will have a great time making the letter sound as they recreate the adorable ABC See, Hear, Do lion.

Letter L Ladybug Craft

Speaking of adorable, these ladybug puppets are an easy way to practice the letter L! Using construction paper, foam or felt, cut one large black circle for the ladybug body and one small black circle for the head. Cut another large red circle for the wings, and then cut that circle in half and add spots. Attach the wings and head with glue. Finally, tape your cute little bug to a popsicle stick and add googly eyes and pipe cleaner antennae. One little smile later, and your child can play with their new ladybug puppet!

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Letter L Lion Snack

This delicious lion snack is sure to fill your little one’s belly and creates a perfect opportunity to practice the letter L sound! Smear peanut butter on half of a bagel. Using bananas, pretzel sticks, and raisins, create the lion’s face. Finally, create the lion’s mane with mandarin orange slices. Yum!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BF,  O, and G ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Letter G Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter G ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the letter G  sound.

Goo Sensory Letters

Who doesn’t like “goo” (even saying it is fun!)? Create this cool "goo" sensory activity by adding hair gel to a ziplock bag and dropping in a bit of food coloring (if desired)—we chose green for the hard letter G. Then add letters and seal the bag, releasing as much air as possible. Now it's time for your child to squish, play, and find the letters!

Letter G Giraffe

G is for Giraffe! Make this fun animal craft with your kids or students. It is a great way to help reinforce the letter G sound!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Gorilla Craft

G is for Gorilla! We love the ABC See, Hear, Do gorilla! Show off your crafting skills by making this at home or in school with your students.  And then tag us! We can’t wait to see your children’s creations!

Letter G Gardens Craft

G is for gardens! Create this pretty garden craft to reinforce the hard letter G. Using forks, paints, and a paintbrush, let your child “plant” their own garden full of flowers!  

Letter G Ghost Snack

This clever little ghost snack is sure to get your kids excited about learning the letter G! Don’t forget to practice that letter G sound as you gobble up this delicious treat!  

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  BF, and O ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

Letter O Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter O ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the short letter O sound.

Letter O Matching Game

Matching games are a simple way for kids to have fun while they reinforce new ideas and concepts. If you make your own matching cards, you can tailor the game to meet your child’s exact needs! To make your own set, trace circles onto cardstock (we used circles since we are learning about letter O this week). Draw a dot pattern on one side to add a bit of color. Then, on the other side, create matching letter sets—uppercase to lowercase matching, sight words, or really anything you want! Then cut them out and enjoy playing your new custom-designed game!

Letter O Owl

O is for Owl! We love using letter crafts to reinforce letter sounds! Try this one out with your kids or students and send us pictures of your finished projects. We love seeing your work!

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ABC See, Hear, Do Octopus Animal Craft

O is for Octopus! Don’t forget to shape your hands into an O and practice saying this fun letter sound with your kids or students!

Letter O Painting

Paint and practice the letter O at the same time? Yes, please! Toilet paper tubes make the perfect “O” shape. Squirt paint on a disposable plate and let your child dip their “O’s” and stamp the paper. As they paint their O’s, practice that short letter O sound!  

Owl Snack

This Oreo-eyed owl will be a hit with your kids! Learning is always so much fun when you get creative! Your taste buds will agree!

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letters C A,  T M, SRIP,  B, and F ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!

 

Are You Frustrated Trying to Teach Your Child to Read?

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Yes? Let me tell you, I HEAR YOU. Teaching a child to read can sometimes be an extremely frustrating process! We all want our children to be good readers. Of course we do. We want them to be ready for kindergarten. We want them to succeed. So when the going gets tough, our worry-meters go berserk. Will my child fall behind? Will he ever get it? Is he down for the count before the bout has even begun? Before you start weeping on the floor, remember: These are all normal desires and normal fears. You’re not crazy or paranoid or overprotective for having them. That being said, we do need to keep them in check when teaching our children in order to respect their developmental process.

When my oldest child was four, I decided to teach her to read. I used a common book that has worked well for millions of children. However, I made one huge mistake: I turned learning to read into a battle of wills. I made a chart (I’m a chart girl), and I vowed that every day we would practice reading for ten to twenty minutes. I was all in. She wasn’t interested. I bought prizes, bribed her, tried every trick in the book. Didn’t matter. She still didn’t want to do it, no matter how much I forced her, pleaded with her, cajoled her each day.

Did I teach her to read? Yes. But guess what? She hated it.

My oldest child hated to read. This was not the outcome I wanted. I wrongly assumed that as soon as she could read, she would love to read. And who knows? Maybe she still wouldn’t like reading, regardless of what I said or did. However, I still think the frustration we both felt while she was learning to read turned her off at the get-go.

Thankfully, I learned from my mistake. With my next child, I used the same learn-to-read book I had with my daughter, but instead of going at my pace, I followed his lead. We moved much more slowly, skipped things he wasn’t interested in, and in the end, we both had a much better experience. I treasured our shared love of reading.

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By the time my daughter entered second grade, I decided I needed to remedy her hatred of reading as well as I could. So we spent the year reading books together and listening to audio books. Don’t be fooled. The change didn’t come instantly, and I can’t say that she ultimately became a bookworm. But...sharing my love of reading with her rather than forcing her to read made a big difference. By the end of second grade, she actually liked reading.

 

By the time I had my fifth child, I knew the book I had used to teach my other children to read would turn into the same frustrating battle of wills I’d experienced with my daughter. This son couldn’t sit still, didn’t like being told what to do, and  showed no interest in reading. I was still determined to teach him, but I needed something new. This is the primary reason I developed the ABC See, Hear, Do. I wanted something that would inspire him to want to learn, that would spark a love of reading. The ABC See, Hear, Do method did the trick.

Long story short? Since children learn so differently, it’s good to have multiple methods of teaching reading. What might be super frustrating for one child might click for another child. Every child is different, which means that there’s no right or wrong pace. So learn from my experience – if you or your child are frustrated with the process, stop what you’re currently doing and try something else. Smother those fears, do your best, and you’ll both be closer (and happier) in the end. 

 

 

 

Letter F Crafts and Activities

We've got a lot of fun letter F  ideas for you! Try some of these crafts or activities to reinforce the  letter F sound.

Fishing for Letters

Fishing for letters is an easy and engaging game to encourage letter sound practice. Tie a piece of string to a stick or spoon to make a fishing rod, and hot glue a magnet to the end of the string. Then cut out paper fish and attach magnetic letters (or just write letters on the paper fish and attach a paper clip to each). Now it’s time to let your child “fish” for letters! Each time they catch a fish/letter, ask them to name the sound associated with the letter. This is a great way to both practice the letter “F” and review previously-learned letters!

Letter F Fireman

F is for fireman! Make this creative craft with your kids or students as you learn all about the letter F.

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ABC See, Hear, Do Flamingo Craft

Create the adorable flamingo from ABC See, Hear, Do! It’s a great way to reinforce the letter F sound while having creative fun with your kids or students!

Letter F Farm Craft

F is for farm! These simple farm animal crafts might get your kids mooing and neighing, but they will also help to reinforce the letter F sound! Draw and color a variety of farm animals on cardstock, cut them out, and glue on clothespins so they stand. Now it’s playtime!

Letter F Snack

Fruit + Faces = FUN (with a capital F)! Create fruit faces on a plate—the sillier, the better! While you and your kids giggle your way through this snack, don’t forget to reinforce that letter F sound!  

In case you missed our previous posts, check out the links below for the letter C A,  T,  M, SRI, P, and B ideas, crafts, and activities!  And don’t forget to subscribe, so you don’t miss any more great letter crafts and activities!